Highlights

  • Those with a more recent strain exhaled 43 to 100 times more of infection into the air
  • The variants are becoming more airborne
  • Tightly fitted masks and better ventilation are needed to stop the spread

Latest news

Your heart needs some extra TLC once you reach middle age. This study will set you in the right direction

Your heart needs some extra TLC once you reach middle age. This study will set you in the right direction

Kunal Khemmu wraps up shoot for 'Kanjoos Makkichoos' with Shweta Tripathi

Kunal Khemmu wraps up shoot for 'Kanjoos Makkichoos' with Shweta Tripathi

First film shot in the space: Russian filmmakers land after shoot aboard space station

First film shot in the space: Russian filmmakers land after shoot aboard space station

On camera: four hurt as speeding car rams into Durga procession in Bhopal

On camera: four hurt as speeding car rams into Durga procession in Bhopal

Sardar Udham: Katrina Kaif is all praise for Vicky Kaushal, says he's 'just pure talent'

Sardar Udham: Katrina Kaif is all praise for Vicky Kaushal, says he's 'just pure talent'

Keep your masks tight as Covid-19 variants are ‘getting better’ at airborne transmission

Researchers at the University of Maryland found that the variants of coronavirus are increasingly becoming airborne.

 

A new study confirms that coronavirus is increasingly becoming airborne and can spread more rapidly and affect a lot more people in just one exhale. The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Maryland said that compared to people infected with the original form of the virus that causes COVID-19, those with a more recent strain exhaled 43 to 100 times more of it into the air, indicating that the disease is evolving to become more airborne.

To test whether masks work in blocking the virus from being transmitted among people, the study measured the amount of SARS-CoV-2 virus that is exhaled by the infected subject first without a mask, and then after putting on a cloth or surgical mask. 

The researchers found that covering the face and mouth using masks reduced the amount of virus that got into the air by about 50%. The study compared the original form of SARS-CoV-2 to the Alpha variant, the dominant one when experimentation was conducted and was published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.

As research indicates that successive variants keep getting better at traveling through the air, better ventilation and tight-fitting masks, in addition to vaccination, can help offset the increased risk.

Also watch: After effects of Covid-19: Symptoms can persist a year post recovery

Also watch: WFH, Office or Hybrid? How employees feel about post-pandemic work culture

Up Next

Keep your masks tight as Covid-19 variants are ‘getting better’ at airborne transmission

Keep your masks tight as Covid-19 variants are ‘getting better’ at airborne transmission

International Day for the Eradication of Poverty 2021: Building Forward Together

International Day for the Eradication of Poverty 2021: Building Forward Together

Being one with nature is always a good idea for kids! A new study has some insights to share

Being one with nature is always a good idea for kids! A new study has some insights to share

You can now add Pandemic Myopia to the list of lockdown after-effects

You can now add Pandemic Myopia to the list of lockdown after-effects

Covid Complications: The higher the BMI, the bigger the risk

Covid Complications: The higher the BMI, the bigger the risk

Diabetes: Rise and dine to control your blood sugar!

Diabetes: Rise and dine to control your blood sugar!