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Pandemic screen-time not good for our eyesight, here's why

Jun 17, 2021 14:13 IST | By Editorji News Desk

A study published in JAMA Ophthalmology, reported that myopia in children aged between 6 to 13 increased up to three times in the year 2020. On average, children were more shortsighted by -0.3 diopters.

Researchers analysed nearly 195,000 test results from school vision screenings collected over six years. They found that not only does myopia appear to be worsening, it seems to be more prevalent too. Only 5.7% of children were found to have myopia from 2015 to 2019; last year, that jumped to 21.5%.

Myopia is the most common ocular disorder and a leading cause of visual impairment in children. High myopia can cause serious retinal damage that can lead to blindness. As per World Health Organization, it is estimated to affect 52% of the world population by 2050.

According to researchers, home confinement during Covid and reduced outdoor activity is associated with worsening eyesight. Those hoping to keep their myopia from worsening, should follow the 20-20-20 rule: Every 20 minutes, take a 20-second break to view something 20 feet away.

Also Read: Pandemic outbreak: Delhi, Mumbai top 2 in hazard index

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